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Yu-Fen (Kathy) Chou, Ph.D.

  • Yu-Fen (Kathy) Chou

    Yu-Fen (Kathy) Chou, Ph.D.

    • Scientific Officer, NYSTEM
    • Adjunct Assistant Professor, School of Public Health, Biomedical Sciences

    • PhD, Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)
    • Postdoctoral training: Center for Regenerative Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital
    • Postdoctoral training: Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Harvard Medical School

Research Interests

Dr. Chou received her doctoral degree in biomedical engineering from University of California, Los Angeles and completed her postdoctoral fellowship training at Center for Regenerative Medicine in Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston. At UCLA, Dr. Chou’s research focused on biomaterials and tissue engineering for bone and cartilage regeneration. A new type of bio-conductive material, termed accelerated biomimetic apatite, was created by Dr. Chou to promote bone regeneration. Three dimensional biodegradable scaffolds incorporated with accelerated apatite and adipose tissue-derived stem cells were proven to heal critical size calvarial defects in mouse model.

Upon completion of her doctorate working on biomaterials and adult stem cells, Dr. Chou decided to extend her research interest in understanding the molecular mechanism of pluripotency in embryonic stem (ES) cells and germline stem cells. A novel stem cell line was derived by Dr. Chou from murine blastocyst embryos using a combination of bFGF, ActivinA and BIO (designated FAB-SCs). FAB-SCs are derived in the absence of LIF and BMP4, growth factors thought to be critical for the maintenance of murine ES cells. FAB-SCs display intriguing molecular and phenotypic properties. This novel blastocyst-derived stem cell line may serve as an important tool to enhance our understanding of stem cell biology.

Select Publications

Chen HH, Welling M, Bloch DB, Muñoz J, Mientjes E, Chen X, Tramp C, Wu J, Yabuuchi A, Chou YF, Buecker C, Krainer A, Willemsen R, Heck AJ, Geijsen N.
DAZL Limits Pluripotency, Differentiation, and Apoptosis in Developing Primordial Germ Cells.
Stem Cell Reports.
(2014)
3
(5):
892-904.
Zuk PA, Chou YF, Mussano F, Benhaim P, Wu BM.
Adipose-Derived Stem Cells and BMP2: Part 2. BMP2 May Not Influence the Osteogenic Fate of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.
Connective Tissue Research.
(2011)
52
(2):
119-32.
Chou YF, Zuk PA, Chang TL, Benhaim P, Wu BM.
Adipose-Derived Stem Cells and BMP2: Part 1. BMP2-Treated Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Do Not Improve Repair of Segmental Femoral Defects.
Connective Tissue Research.
(2011)
52
(2):
109-18.
Chou, Y.-F. and Yabuuchi, A.
Murine embryonic stem cell derivation, in vitro pluripotency characterization, and in vivo teratoma formation.
Current Protocols in Toxicology.
(2011)
Chapter 2
Unit 2.22.
Chou YF, Chen HH, Eijpe M, Yabuuchi A, Chenoweth JG, Tesar P, Lu J, McKay RD, Geijsen N.
The Growth Factor Environment Defines Distinct Pluripotent Ground States in Novel Blastocyst-Derived Stem Cells.
Cell.
(2008)
135
(3):
449-61.