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Jill Taylor, Ph.D.

  • Jill Taylor, Ph.D.

    Jill Taylor, Ph.D.

    • Director of the Wadsworth Center
    • Faculty Member, Wadsworth School of Laboratory Sciences

    • Ph.D., University of Queensland

    jill.taylor@health.ny.gov
    (518) 474-3157
    Fax: (518) 474-3439

Research Interests

The Wadsworth Center, as the only research-intensive public health laboratory in the nation, strives to set the standards to which other public health laboratories aspire. As Deputy Director since September, 2005, Interim Director since August, 2012, and Director since May, 2014, Dr. Taylor is guiding Wadsworth's future research directions and advancing the Center's critical mission in population health. As a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors of the CDC's Office of Infectious Diseases, and a member of the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine, she also contributes to policy discussions at the national level. Day-to-day, she ensures the efficient management of the Center by working closely with senior administrative and scientific staff in the laboratories, as well as with Executive Staff within the Department of Health. In all regards, Dr. Taylor relies upon a commitment to openness and to strong communication, coordination and problem-solving skills, whether developing a future research agenda or formulating continuity of operations plans.

Dr. Taylor first joined the Wadsworth Center in 1986 as a research affiliate in a laboratory focused on research on vaccinia virus. In 1990, she joined Virogenetics Corporation where she was responsible for the successful development of three poxvirus-based recombinant vaccine vectors for veterinary use. Dr. Taylor rejoined Wadsworth in 1999 as director of the Viral Genotyping Laboratory where she oversaw clinical research studies of HIV drug resistance and hepatitis C virus. In 2002, she was appointed director of the newly formed Clinical Virology Program. In this position she assumed broad responsibility for introducing molecular technologies to ensure responsiveness to the state's changing public health needs, with particular emphasis on influenza virus.